Verbal Dynamics Of Dialogues in Animation

An animation film or a cartoon character consists of many layers of elements. These layers unfold to show the authenticity of the character. They show us different parts and sides of the individual. Animation is dominated by action and movements but a huge chunk of it is also based on dialogue.

Different Dialogue styles

Various animation studies used this element of dialogue in different ways. Disney used it in a way of reprimanding or whenever a conflict arose. Dialogue was a way to set things straight with discipline.

For example when Mickey trains Pluto, Donald complains against the world. Their style of dialogue was preachy and moralistic. Whereas the Warner Bros used dialogue to add a sense of comedy. Their dialogues were joke oriented and this style of dialogue in animation was established by them. Simple dialogues like ‘What’s up Doc?‘ showed Bugs’ Bunnys’ superiority! or ‘You realise, this means war’ when things didn’t go the Bugs’ way. Daffy on the other hand with his consistent lispy babble would utter in great shame, ‘You are despicable’. Elmer Fudd would quietly hunt wabbits whereas Yosemite Sam would hype himself up and say ‘I’m seagoing Sam, the blood thirstiest, shoot ’em firstiest, doggone worstiest, buccaneer that’s ever sailed the Spanish Main!’.

All of these Verbal Dynamics,

be it admonishing or humourous added texture and remarkably supported the visuals. Philip Brophy suggested that Disney soundtrack leaned towards the Symphonic which was inspired by classical aspirations, poetic, balletic and operatic. On the other hand, the Warner Bros leaned towards the Cacophonic which included more urban, industrialized, beat-based vocabulary. Now that you know the secret of how the most successful animation studios used dialogue and language in their projects in order to be more striking and relatable, how are you going to use it? The Disney style? Warner Bros style? Or something new altogether?

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